4 months ago   •   113 notes
  • If the rise in uninformed opinion was limited to impenetrable subjects that would be one thing, but the scourge seems to be spreading. Everywhere you look these days, America is in a rush to embrace the stupid. Hell-bent on a path that’s not just irrational, but often self-destructive. Common-sense solutions to pressing problems are eschewed in favour of bumper-sticker simplicities and blind faith.

    6 months ago   •   2,443 notes   •   VIA: jtotheizzoe   •   SOURCE: okkultmotionpictures
  • jtotheizzoe:

    This pi may be old, but it’s still delicious.  

    Gah, I love vintage Coronet Instructional Films. You can watch the whole Coronet archive here, for free!

    via okkultmotionpictures:

    Happy OKKULT Pi Day


    EXCERPTS >|< Meaning Of Pi (1949)


     | Hosted at: Internet Archive
     | From: A/V Geek Film Archive
     | Download: Ogg | h.264 | MPEG4
     | Digital Copy: Public Domain Mark 1.0

    A series of Animated GIFs excerpted from Meaning of Pi (1949). The video Explains how pi denotes the ratio of a circle to its diameter, shows the use of circles in art, industry and commerce, outlines a procedure by which the numerical value of pi can be checked and reviewed, and describes the discovery and importance of pi.

    We invite you to watch the full video HERE


    Excerpts by OKKULT Motion Pictures: a collection of GIFs excerpted from open source/unknown/rare/controversial moving images.
    A digital curation project for the diffusion of open knowledge.

    >|<

    6 months ago   •   512 notes   •   VIA: jtotheizzoe   •   SOURCE: jtotheizzoe
  • jtotheizzoe:

I love you, Tumblr.
Happy Pi Day!

I like that every page of tumblr I navigate to/reload has a different alt text message .

    jtotheizzoe:

    I love you, Tumblr.

    Happy Pi Day!

    I like that every page of tumblr I navigate to/reload has a different alt text message .

    6 months ago   •   119,945 notes   •   VIA: jtotheizzoe   •   SOURCE: astrasperas
  • Forget stardust—you are iron. Your blood is nothing but ferrous liquid. When you bleed, you reek of rust. It is iron that fills your heart and sits in your veins. And what is iron, really, unless it’s forged?

    You are iron.

    And you are strong.

     - n.t. (via thelittle-hobbit)

    We live in a rusty universe. Oxygenated heme is the color of life, the color of passion, the reason we see red of as ripe and warm, the reason we see it as dangerous and frightening. Blood, breath and Earth, we’re all rusty.

    #science  #iron  #rust  
    8 months ago   •   918 notes   •   VIA: jtotheizzoe   •   SOURCE: jtotheizzoe
  • Fact: if you sleep with a Carl Sagan book under your pillow, you wake up smarter through the process of cosmosis.

    jtotheizzoe:

    (Shamelessly stolen from David Grinspoon on Twitter)

    8 months ago   •   14,338 notes   •   VIA: jtotheizzoe   •   SOURCE: cultivatevision
  • jtotheizzoe:

    staceythinx:

    cultivatevision:

    Series of posters created for the love of math, nature, art, and education.

    Prints available: http://meganemoore.storenvy.com/

    If only there were one for reticulated splines, the set would be complete!

    9 months ago   •   16,186 notes   •   VIA: jtotheizzoe   •   SOURCE: jtotheizzoe
  • jtotheizzoe:

    Grace Hopper

    Rear Admiral Grace Hopper would have been 107 today, and is being honored with a great Google Doodle. It’s quite literally impossible for us to imagine, as we sit here reading about her on the internet, but people used to use things like paper and pencils and chalk and slide rules to solve (and often not solve) complicated problems. Grace Hopper quite simply helped usher in the modern age, her impact, I think, is no less than the steam engine or the cotton gin.

    Some awesome stuff she did: Grace Hopper developed first compiler, allowing computer calculations to move beyond simple arithmetic and into more complex problems. She also developed first standardized computer language, COBOL, which laid the groundwork for all the languages we use today.

    One day she found a dead moth disrupting one of the electronic relays in the Mark 1 computer, and upon removing it (and fixing the computer), the term “debugging" was born. Here’s her daily log from that day, with the offending moth taped to the page:

    Beyond that, she was a charming scientific communicator, and she possessed a marvelous ability to make people, and mind you this was in a time when almost no one owned their own computer, truly appreciate both the importance and the complexity of computing technology.

    She famously carried around a bundle of nanoseconds in her purse for illustrative purposes. Here she is charming the socks off of David Letterman, and giving him a nanosecond of his very own (don’t miss the picosecond joke, either) :

    12 months ago   •   509 notes   •   VIA: jtotheizzoe   •   SOURCE: jtotheizzoe
  • jtotheizzoe:

    Doug Pedersen takes a light-hearted look at some of NASA’s most famous missions in his NASA Mashups series. Check ‘em all out here.

    1 year ago   •   3,219 notes   •   VIA: jtotheizzoe   •   SOURCE: jtotheizzoe
  • jtotheizzoe:

Richard Feynman’s legendary lectures on physics, all fifty-two chapters, are now available in HTML form (which for the youngsters means “they’re on the internet”).
Of course, you can always watch seven of them in video form thanks to Bill Gates.
If anyone needs me, I’ll be in my physics bunk.

    jtotheizzoe:

    Richard Feynman’s legendary lectures on physics, all fifty-two chapters, are now available in HTML form (which for the youngsters means “they’re on the internet”).

    Of course, you can always watch seven of them in video form thanks to Bill Gates.

    If anyone needs me, I’ll be in my physics bunk.